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May, 1970 Volume 11, Number 5 

THE MARATHON 

The Marathon this year begins on May 1, at 7:00 p.m., 
following the evening News. It will continue, 24 hours a day, 
until we reach our goal, which is $125,000 in pledges, or 
until Monday, May 18 at the very latest. We hope to be back 
to our regular programming by midnight on Friday, May 15. 
With your help, it should be possible to reach our goal in just 
two weeks. Last May, we were forced to hold a $ 150,000 
cash Marathon. It went on for too long, to the eventual distress 
and collapse of staff and listeners alike; but we\n'eeide'dl the 
cash for the down payment on the Church. This year, things 
are a bit better. We can afford to shoot for a $ 125,000 
pledge Marathon. This means regular programming will be 
resumed as soon as pledges go over the top. But, of course, 
for this to be realistic, pledges must be honored with all 
due speed. 

Last year, the entire Marathon proceeds went for the pur- 
chase of the Church: down payment, architects' fees, mortgage 
interest, and the like. As a result, WBAI began the summer 
with an operating deficit, which increased during the tra- 
ditionally slack summer months, to the point where we now 
need about $50,000 just to catch up. And, of course, the 
station needs funds to complete the move to the Church. At 
present, we are still operating schizophrenically, broadcasting 
from 39th Street, with our offices in the basement of the 
Church. Not only is this no way to run a radio station, but 
we are obligated to complete the move to the Church by this 
summer, and we expect to begin actual construction of our 
new studios in the Church shortly after the Marathon. 

Here is the Budget for the Marathon: 

Operating deficit $50,000 

May expenses $30,000 

1970 Mortgage interest $25,000 

Reserve for the summer $20,000 

TOTAL $125,000 

This year, there will be some programming during the Mara- 
thon — if the money holds up. The Evening Newscast will be 
heard nightly at 6:15, though it may be auctioned off bulletin 
by bulletin. Most of the reports from the Pacifica Washington 
Bureau will be broadcast, along with Arts Extras, Public 
Affairs Specials, and excerpts from live Free Music Store 
events. 



FREE MUSIC STORE 

The Free Music Store winds up the season with a series of 
weekend events from the Church: see Marathon listings on 
the following pages for details. We would like to thank a lot 
of people, including Jack Romann and Baldwin Piano (who 
let us use one of their new concert grands), George Krippen- 
stapel (who kept it in tune), Steve von Hasseln, John Ackley 
and Ward Bennett (who recorded most of the events), Adam 
Griswold (Techie-in-residence), Carol Reich and Liza Cowan 
(who helped lots), Mel Greenberg (who helped more than lots), 
not to mention all the performers as well as everyone else 
who came and took part. The Free Music Store will come 
back next fall. In the meantime, we will continue our stereo 
broadcasts of the tapes. 
OUR THANKS TO CONRAD LYNN 

We regret that Conrad Lynn is no longer able to continue 
his series of Commentaries over WBAI. Mr. Lynn has other 
commitments which take up most of his time. We want to 
thank Mr. Lynn for his many years of thought-provoking and 
interesting commentaries, and we will welcome him back on 
our air at any time. 
NEW PROGRAMS AND PROGRAM CHANGES, 

Among the new programs to be aired beginning this month 
are the following, all described more fully in the regular list- 
ings. Black Awareness (Fridays, 1 1 :00 p.m.); The Ecology of 
Belief (Thursdays, 11:00 p.m.); High School Commentary 
(5/25, 6:00 p.m.); Non-Event of the Day (to be broadcast 
sporadically during the Marathon and maybe after it too); 
Strange Bedfellows (weekdays at noon); Who are You, What 
do You Do and Doesn't it do something to Your Head? 
broadcast sporadically; The Word (weekdays, \2:\5); Free 
Voice of Greece (Mondays, 7:45 p.m.). 

Womankind, with Nanette Rainone, has been lengthened 
to thirty minutes, and will also be broadcast thirty minutes 
later — on Wednesdays at 8:15 p.m. Films in Focus, with An- 
drew Sarris, will be heard 15 minutes earlier, at 7:45 p.m. 
Falling Apart has also been moved up, to 8:30 p.m. Mondays. 
ART WORK IN THE FOLIO 

The cover for the May Folio was created in the nick of 
time by our long-time friend and art donor, Ed Renfro, who 
has also kindly donated several drawings used throughout the 
Folio. Many thanks, Ed. Photographs (used in their contact 
state) are by Danny Cornyetz, Paul Busby, and several other 
photographers who forgot to sign their works. 

Finally, a personal note of thanks to Ben Sommers, without 
whom we couldn't have completed this Folio. 



STAFF 



General Manager (Acting) 

BOB KUTTNER 

Public Affairs Producer 

BILL SCHECHNER 

News Director 

PAUL FISCHER 

Washington Bureau 

STEVE BOOKSHESTER 

BOB HINTON 

Netva & Public Affairs Staff 

MARJORIE WAXMAN 

NANETTE RAINONE 

Drama & Literature 

BILL HENDERSON, Director 

MILTON HOFFMAN, Associate Director 

Music Department 

ERIC SALZMAN, Director 

DAN KAVANAUGH, Associate Director 

JOSH BAUMAN 

Free Music Store 

LIZA COWAN 

Production Department 

FRANK COFFEE, Director 

ADAM GRISWOLD 

DAVID LERNER 

Chiej Announcer 

STEVE POST 

Staff Announcers 

ROBBIE BARISH 

JOHN BASES 

NEAL CONAN 

CHARLES PITTS 

CARYL RATNER 

Chief Engineer 

TOM WHITMORE 

Recording Engineers 

DAVID RAPKIN 

PETER ZANGER 

HERB PERTEN 

NANCY ALLEN 

Promotion 

JANET BOULTON 

Comptroller 
BRAHNA ALBERT 

Bookkeeper 
MARIA IGARTUA 
Subscription Registrars 
FRANK BAEZ 
ANDY PARKS 
Office Manager 
KATHY DOBKIN 
Folio Editors 
BENJAMIN SOMMERS (Acting) 
ROSE MARY ANDERSON 
Switchboard Operator 
NANCY FAZAKAS 
Maintenance 
ARTHUR SHERROD 
None of the Above 
BOB PASS 
PAUL GORMAN 
LARRY JOSEPHSON 
JULIUS LESTER 
The WBAI Folio Is not sold, It Is sent free to each 
subscriber to the station. The program listings are 
published every month as a service to subscribers 
who support our nonprofit, noncommercial sta- 
tion at the annual rate of $24.00 (student and 
retired persons subscription rate: $15.00 a year). 
All donations are tax deductible and checks should 
be made payable to "Paclfica Foundation — WBAI." 
WBAI. is on the air from 7:00 a.m. to 3:30 a.m., 
Monday to Friday, and 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 a.m., 
Saturday and Sunday. Our transmitter Is located 
In the Empire State Building and we broadcast 
with an Effective Radiated Power of 5.4 KW (hori- 
zontal) and 3.85 KW (vertical). Power equivalent 
to 50,000 watts at 500 feet. Antenna: 1223 feet 
above averace terrain. Height above sea level: 
1515 feet. The studio Is located at 30 East 39th 
Street, New York, N.Y. 10016. 
The offices are located at 359 East 62nd Street, 
New York, N. Y. 10021. Phone: 826-0880, Area 
code for both phones: 212. 
WBAI Is owned and operated by the Paclfica Foun- 
dation, a nonprofit institution. The other Paclfica 
stations area KPFA, Berkeley, California 94704, 
KPFK, Los Angeles, California, and KPFT, Hous- 
ton, Texas 77002. Subscriptions are transferable. 
The duration of programs scheduled Is approxi- 
mate. The dates after listings Indicate past or 
future broadcast. The program listings are copy- 
righted (Copyright 1970, WBAI) and are not to 
be reprinted without written permission. Extracts 
may be reprinted for highlight, listings. 
WBAI is not responsible for the return or safety 
of unsolicited tapes or manuscripts. 



NATIONAL 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



R. Gordon Agnew 
Peyton Bryan 
Henry M. Elson 
Benjamin Feld 
Stephen Fischer 
Carolyn Goodman 
Mel Greenberg 
Hallock Hoffman 
Rudy Hurwich, President 
Ronald M. Loeb 
Mrs. Adie Marks 
Albert Ruben 
Harold Taylor 
Frank S.Wyle 



WBAI 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Joseph Cadden 

Stephen M. Fischer 

Carolyn Goodman, Chairman 

Melvin Greenberg 

Harvey Karp 

Lawrence Pinkham 

Albert Ruben 




MAY COMMENTARIES 

AFRICA SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 2 Sun 

days, 5/17, 31, 7:00 p.m. Arthur Vi- 
lankulu and guests. 

BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS Sunday, 
5/24, 7:00 p.m. David Rothenberg of the 
Fortune Society and guests on the pro- 
blems of prisoners and ex-cons. 
EDUCATION COMMENTARY Thurs- 
day, 5/28, 6:00 p.m. Neil Postman com- 
ments. 

HIGH SCHOOL COMMENTARY Mon 
day, 5/25, 6:00 p.m. With student leaders. 
MONTH IN REVIEW Friday, 5/29, 
8:00 p.m. Editors of Monthly Review 
with guests. 

NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS Saturdays, 
6:45 p.m. Sam Julty, columnist for Auto 
Magazine. 

PA'LANTE Mondays, 11:00 p.m. Mem- 
bers of the Young Lords with music and 
guests. 

RENT AND HOUSING IN THE CITY 
Monday, 5/18, 6:00 p.m. Members of 
the Metropolitan Council on Housing. 
A SATIRICAL VIEW Fridays, 7:30 p.m. 
Marshall Efron and aides on current 
events. 

SCIENCE COMMENTARY Thursday, 
5/21, 6:00 p.m. Glenn L. Paulson, co- 
chairman of the Scientists' Committee 
for Public Information. 
SOVIET PRESS AND PERIODICALS 
Saturdays, 5/23, 7:15 p.m. and 5/30, 
7:00 p.m. Survey with William Mandel. 
TALKING POLITICS Fridays, 6:00 p.m. 
Neal Freernan, editor and critic. 
THE free' voice OF GREECE Mon- 
days, 7:45 p.m. News and commentary 
on the present situation of Greece under 
the Colonels. Hosts are George Frangos 
and Peter Schwab. Produced by Ada- 
mantia Pollis. 

THE THIRD WORLD Thursday, 5/28, 
8:15 p.m. Members of the Committee of 
Returned Volunteers. 
VICTOR PERLO Tuesdays, 6:00 p.m. 
Economist and author. 
WOMANKIND Wednesdays, 8:15 p.m. 
Nanette Rainone and members of wom- 
en's liberation groups. 



Page 4 



WBAI 



Regular Programming 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

* Indicates program from our Washington Bureau. 
NEWS Mon-to-Fri., 6:15 p.m. Newscast 
with Paul Fischer. Shoptalk with guests: 
Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs. City Coverage 
of local issues: Mon., Wed., Fri. 
WEEKEND NEWS Sat.-Sun., 6:30 p.m. 
WAR SUMMARY and LATE NEWS 
Mon-to-Fri., 10:45 p.m. 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL Tues. & 
Thurs., 7:00 p.m. 

*CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY Fridays, 
7:00 p.m. The weekly roundup of impor- 
tant and not-so-important events in Wash- 
ington. 

*CAVEAT EMPTOR Monday, 5/25, 
7:1 5 p.m. A look at an important con- 
sumer issue or a Federal regulatory com- 
mission or a health or food problem. 
♦CONFRONTATION: WASHINGTON 
Wednesday, 5/20, 7:15 p.m. The D.C. 
Bureau looks at a matter of current in- 
terest, often with visiting journalists. 
FALLING APART Mondays, 8:30 p.m. 
Everything from subways, telephones, or- 
ganized religion, the institution of mar- 
riage, and big Hollywood studios is falling 
apart. Dissection by various staff members 
of WBAI. 

* JUDICIAL REVIEW Wednesday, 5/27, 
7:15 p.m. Lawrence Speiser, Washington 
Director of the ACLU, discusses Supreme 
Court decisions and pending cases with 
journalists who cover the Court. 
♦MILITARY MONITOR Monday, 5/18, 
7:15 p.m. What the Pentagon is doing 
with your taxes, and what the opposition 
is doing to stop the Pentagon from doing 
those things. 



DRAMA AND LITERATURE 

ARTS EXTRA 2 Fridays, 5/22, 8:00 p.m. 
5/29, 9:45 p.m. Hours left open for pro- 
grams of special importance in the arts, 
BEFORE YOU TRUST IN CRITICS 
Sundays, 8:00 p.m. A unique interview 
series that explores the basic beliefs of 
individual critics in the various arts. 
BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR BURN 
Sundays. 6:45 p.m. Reviews of current 
books. 

THE ECOLOGY OF BELIEF Thursdays 
1 1 :00 p.m. On the assumption that psy- 
chic darkness has wiped out the sanity- 
producing art of belief. The East, the 
occult, Jung. Reading, interviews, music. 
FILMS IN FOCUS Wednesdays, 7:45 



p.m. Andrews Sarris comments, on mov- 
ies old and new. 

FROM LONDON Sunday, 5/24, 8:30 
p.m. Roger Simon, theatrical producer 
and director, comments on London 
theatre. 

THE MOVIES Thursday, 5/21, 8:15 p.m. 
Someone in them, about them. 
ON SCREEN Thursdays, 11:30 p.m. Mil- 
ton Hoffman and other connoisseurs of 
film and TV on various aspects of the 
media. 

PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
(PYP) Mon-through-Fri., 3.30 p.m. Satur- 
days, 10:00 a.m. All kinds of hours for 
all kinds of kids. 

STRANGE BEDFELLOWS Mon-to-Fri., 
12 noon. Contentious voices from the 
middle of the human sensibility gap. 
Juxtaposed readings: Socrates and J. Ed- 
gar Hoover; Albert Camus and Norman 
Vincent Peale; Thomas Paine and Rich- 
ard M. Nixon. 

THEATER, NEW YORK Saturdays, 
7:30 p.m. Ann Rivers on off- and off- 
off Broadway, usually with guests. 
THEATER REVIEW Sunday, 5/24, 8:45 
p.m. Isaiah Sheffer on the curent Broad- 
way productions. 

MUSIC 

AFTERNOON MUSIC Mon-to-Fri., 4:30 
p.m. Collages on themes given in daily 
listings. 

COUNTRY MUSIC Sundays, 5:45 p.m. 
Genuine blue grass. 

GOLDEN VOICES Sundays, 10:00 a.m. 
Great old opera recordings presented by, 
the late Anthony Boucher. (KPFA Ar- 
chives). 

LET IT ALL HANG OUT Saturdays. 
4:00 p.m. It all does: string quartets, 
blues. Reds, chorus, rock, country, Mo- 
zart, snippets, dollups of folk, and sound. 
MORNING MUSIC Mon-to-Fri., 9:15 
a.m. Just like the afternoons, except when 
different. 

MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES 
Sundays, 9:30 a.m. Ethnic music pre- 
sented by the late Dr. Henry Cowell. 
(WBAI Archives). 

OF GENERAL INTEREST 

BLACK AWARENESS Fridays, 11:30 
p.m. Programs from and for the Black 
community, produced by Dolores Cos- 
tello. 

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
Thursdays, 5:30 p.m. Andy Parks an- 
nounces upcoming civic and social events. 
ENVIRONMENTAL OUTRAGES Tues 
days, 2:30 p.m. Discussion and debate 
on ecological issues. 



THE GREAT PROLETARIAN CUL- 
TURAL REVOLUTION Tuesdays, 8:30 
p.m. Julius Lester with people and music. 
HOMOSEXUAL NEWS Thursdays, 8:00 
p.m. Program from and for the homo- 
sexual community. 

IN THE BEGINNING Mon-to-Fri., 7:00 
a.m. Larry Josephson with just about 
everything, joy included. 
THE INSURGENTS: Churchmen Tues 
day, 5/26, 11:00 p.m. Jack Deedy with 
activists in the churches. 
THE INSURGENTS: The Health System 
Wednesday, 5/27, 11:00 p.m. Ivan Ru- 
bin with members of the medical pro- 
fession. 

THE INSURGENTS: Lawyers Tuesday, 
5/19, 11:00 p.m. Eric Seitz and guests 
from the legal profession. 
LUNCHPAIL Tues., Thurs., Sat., 12:30 
p.m. Paul Gorman with guests, music, 
cheer, and talkback. 

THE OUTSIDE Sat. and Sun., 12 mid- 
night. Steve Post and rigidly controlled 
chaos. 

RADIO UNNAMEABLE Mon-to-Fri.. 
12 midnight. Bob Fass with friends, mu- 
sic, interruptions. 

RED BEANS, RICE, AND OTHER 
TOPICAL ISSUES Thursdays, 8:45 p.m. 
Neal Conan sometimes music, some- 
times talk, often both. 
REPORT TO THE LISTENER Tues- 
days, 7:45 p.m. The Station Manager 
speaks. 

AT THE RISK OF SEEMING RIDIC- 
ULOUS 2 Wednesdays, 5/20, 27, 8:45 
p.m. Music and activities. 
TECHIE TIME (STEREO) Fridays, 7:45 
p.m. Mssrs. Rapkin and Zanger and all 
kinds of sound. 

WHATEVER BECAME OF . . .? Tues- 
days, 8:00 p.m. Richard Lamparski in- 
terviews movie stars and the like. 
THE ZEN CHEF Saturdays, 12 noon. 
Taped in the kitchen of Li-Min Mo. 



NEW THIS MONTH 
The Word 
Mon-to-Fri., 12:15 p.m. 

Experiments in radio 
plus fiction plus words 



WBAI 



Page 5 



May Program Highlights 



The following programs are of special in- 
terest and are preceded by a * in the 
listings. 
PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 

Presents stories from Rudyard Kip- 
ling's classic, Just So Stories: "How the 
Camel Got His Hump," "How the Leop- 
ard Got His Spots," and many more. 
Read by Sheldon Rudolph at 3:30 on 
May 1, 22, 29. 

THE LITERATURE OF ASIA: PO- 
ETRY, STORY AND SONG 

Presented by the Drama and Literature 
Department of WBAI and the Asian 
Literature Program of the Asia Society. 
Each of the nine programs in this series 
will leave an impression of a particular 
country and culture. All of the partici- 
pants have had a personal and profes- 
sional involvement with the material that 
they are presenting. Two of the pro- 
grams will be devoted to the great Urdu 
poet, Ghalib (1797-1869). Aijaz Ahmad 
will read the original Urdu and Adrienne 
Rich will present English translations of 
his poetry; on the following program 
some of the same poems will be sung in 
Urdu by Brij Saxena at 9:00 p.m. on 
May 18, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28, 29, 30, 31. 
PROTEST EXTRA 

When we went to press in early April, 
our spies told us to expect plentiful pro- 
tests throughout the month — antiwar, an- 
tidraft, antitax, and more for good meas- 
ure. If our spies were right, you will 
hear a distillation of our reports. (5/18) 
THE SUBTLE ART OF REJECTION 

Some of the world's greatest and most 
prolific writers (as yet undiscovered) read 
their favorite rejection notices. Produced 
for the Drama and Literature Department 



of WBAI by Gil Jardine. (5/18) 
PYP 

Ellen Jaffe presents a special program 
on Programs for Young People: "The 
Voice of the Children" — poetry written 
by those most honest and expressive of 
all people, children. Tuesday, May 19, 
at 3:30 p.m. 
AUDIO ORGANUM for 7 sound sorces 

The debut preformance of the WBAI 
music-theater ensemble directed and 
mixed by Eric Salzman and Dan Ka- 
vanaugh with Imogen Foote and Janet 
Steele, sopranos, Janet Sullivan, mezzo- 
soprano, and Bill Zukof, counter-tenor. 
From Music Day. STEREO In three 
parts, 5/20, 26, 27. 
DIMENSIONS IN BLACK SOUND 

Bob Northern with Ron Carter in a 
program dedicated to the memory of 
Eric Dolphy. (5/22) 
JOEL CHADABE Rendez-vous 

Composed at the new electronic studio 
at State U. at Albany. STEREO (5/22) 
ECO-MUSIC 

Urban decay meets Mother Nature in 
the cataclysmic modern music drama by 
Dan Kavanaugh and Peter Zanger. A rare 
and touching example of music depart- 
ment cooperation with Bob Kuttner and 
Public Affairs; brought to you direct from 
Ecology Day. STEREO (5/22) 
THE MIND'S EYE THEATER; 
THERE'S A LITTLE AMBIGUITY 
OVER THERE AMONG THE BLUE- 
BELLS 

A series of poemplays by Ruth Krauss 
make up this final production of the 
Word Players. "This is a Krauss sampler 
disorganized to turn you on to the possi- 
bilities of selection and juxtaposition . . ." 



specialties of the Word Players, who are 
David Haight, Susan Miller, Sherry Pock- 
well, Ann Rivers, Julio Scherer, and 
Edgar Walker, directed by Baird Searles. 
Technical production by David Rapkin. 
TALAOTATB is published by Something 
Else Press and used by the author's kind 
permission. (5/23) 
BALKAN FOLK MUSIC HOUR #4 

Program of records produced in Bul- 
garia, Greece, Rumania, Yugoslavia, and 
Turkey. Presented by Martin Koenig. 
(5/25) 
PYP 

Fairies, elves, the "little people" — do 
they really exist? Patrick Merla has the 
answer on Programs for Young People. 
Tuesday May 26 at 3:30 p.m. 
THE LONG RUSSIAN WINTER: May 
Night 

Rimsky-Korsakov opera composed in 
1878. Produced by Kathy Dobkin. (5/31) 
A PRESS CONFERENCE WITH FE- 
DERICO FELLINI 

After a screening of his new film 
Fellini Satyricon, the great Italian film 
director, and the creator of such master- 
picies as La Dolce Vita, La Strada, S'/z, 
and Juliet of the Spirits answers questions 
from an audience composed of college 
students and professors. Milton Hoffman 
is the commentator. (5/31) 
SCIENTISTS SPEAK OUT 

Earth Day 1970. A discussion of 
events that happened on, and the sig- 
nificance of. Earth Day, in New York 
City and the country with representatives 
of the Environmental Action Coalition. 
Glenn Paulson of the Scientists Conv 
mittee for Public Information moder- 
ates. (5/31) 



FRIDAY, MAY 1 

7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry awaits the 

millenium — impatiently. 
9:00 WAR SUMMARY and NEWS (4/30) 
9:15 MORNING MUSIC: Quintets, (4/23) 
10:15 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 

(4/30) 
10:30 EDUCATION COMMENTARY: Post 

man. (4/30) 
10:45 HOMOSEXUAL NEWS (4/30) 
11:00 THE THIRD WORLD (4/30) 
11:30 EDUCATION: An Alternate View. 

With Parker Barrata. (4/30) 
12:00 STRANGE BEDFELLOWS Content 

ious voices from the middle of the 



human sensibility gap. Juxtaposed read- 
ings from such odd couples as Socrates 
and J. Edgar Hoover, Albert Camus 
and Norman Vincent Peale, Thomas 
Paine and Richard M. Nixon. Suggest- 
ions welcome. 

12:15 THE WORD Fiction, long and short 
— sometimes read, sometimes adapted 
and performed before your very ears. 

12:30 ON SCREEN Milton Hoffman on 
TV and movies. (4/30) 

1:00 AUGUSTYN BLOCH Music by the 
contemporary Polish composer pre- 
sented by Wanda Tomcaykowska of the 
Polish Arts and Culture Foundation of 
San Francisco. (KPFA) 

2:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL (4/30) 



3:30 *PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Our 

favorite story-teller, Sheldon Rudolph, 
reads some stories from Rudyard 
Kipling's classic Just So Stories. 

4:30 AFTERNOON MUSIC: Basses and 
double-basses. HENZE Concerto for 
Double-bass (Gary Karr). (5/26) 

5:45 MISCELLANY 

6:00 TALKING POLITICS with Neal Free- 
man. (5/16) 

6:15 NEWS 

Newscast by Paul Fischer ' 
City: a look at the local issues. 

Marathon 



Page 6 

In closing, I just want to say this will be my fifth Marathon. 
In the first one, I didn't know any better so I thought it was 
sort of fun. It was also Mrs. Miller. The second one was a 
pain in the neck and Alice's Restaurant ad infinitum. The 
third was a crashing bore, but it was part of my job so I did it. 
Last year's was a total disaster that landed me in the hospital 
and taught me to hate Marathons. Quite frankly, I dread this 
one more than I dread almost anything else in the world. I will 
describe, briefly, some of my more vivid nightmares, in the 
hopes that you'll take the clues. 

#1. Ten Million Volunteers sleeping in corners and leaving 
their half-eaten sandwiches all over the place and pouring 
water into the switchboard and refusing to be sweeper. (Clue: 
when we need volunteers, we put out a call over the air, so 
don't just walk in, wait for our panicked plea and then call 
to offer your assistance). 



WBAI 





fcp. 1*2. . VoUnte^l'S Sleepirij i« corw^rj. 

#2. Pledge-cards out of alphabetical order (which means 
that pledgers keep getting billed even after they have sent in 
their money), filled in illegibly with felt-tip pens (Clue: when 
we need volunteers, it's usually not to come on down and have 
a blast. It's to do awful, disgusting, menial work, under in- 
tolerable conditions with people yelling at you all the time. 
Jobs range from the highly-coveted Answering of Phones, to 
scraping the slime off the floor, to bouncing well-meaning but 
inessential groupies from our gates, to stuffing envelopes). 





^ 


'jmM 




^^■' 


E?q«*i^ 



F.rf.3. Huokfclt pUije. Fig.f. vVtfw«ri»>rf pKonej. 





Rd.f. ^Itine •»» rt«or« 



Rirf.t. 6«Mncing «rouf\A. 





Uy»i*.t by CWe.rlcs Pottftr 



#3. Home-made fried chicken being given to me on the 
switchboard during a bingo (nothing you can do about this 
one, folks). 

#4. Not enough bingos (a bingo is when the whole switch- 
board lights up. "The whole switchboard" consists of all of 10 
lines, most of which are usually broken) (Clue: keep those 
pledges coming, don't just wait for a matching fund, call during 
a program, or when things are particularly boring. You won't 
get a busy signal then. Remember to send in your pledge after- 
wards). 

#5. Phone calls from parents whose kids have been missing 
for days whose last words were "I'll be at BAI." (Clue: listen, 
greasies, tell your folks where you're going and when you'll 
return, and don't just come to WBAI because you have no 
place else to live for a few days. We're not a hotel or a pad). 

#6. Having my scotch tape stolen again 





P/dJ. N«t«liot*t. Rj. ». K«ep «kn eye •« &*»>ny. 

#7. General Confusion as to the Difference between Pledges 
and Money. (Clue: The running total kept during this Mara- 
thon will be of pledges and not cash on hand. When we take 
your pledge, we assume you will honor it, and that the amount 
of actual cash will equal the amount in pledges. However, 
there is usually some discrepancy, and this is why we had to 
hold subsequent minithons: because less money came in than 
was pledged. Some people just like phoning in phony pledges. 
We hate them, but there is not much we can really do about 
this. Many other well-meaning people simply overpledge* 




Overpledging is almost as bad as underpledging, so please 
keep track of your pledges). 

#8. Having too many volunteers when we don't need them, 
and having no volunteers for the first few hours of the Mara- 
thon. (Clue: we'll solve part 1. You can solve part 2 by offer- 
ing your services for the first night of the Marathon. To do 
this, do absolutely nothing until the last week in April. Then, 
phone me at 826-0880 and let me know what hours you're 
free. Especially if you're the Birnbaums or Jim Bruce). 

#9. The Barter Department: For better or worse, it will be 
reinstituted this year. One reason it was dropped last year 
was that it was too confusing to run, and required too much 
in the way of personnel and money to follow through ef- 
ficiently. However, we're willing to try again, with the follow- 
ing warnings, stipulations and instructions. 

— the Barter Department will be operative ONLY during 
the Marathon. 

— we will put those who offer items and those who take 
items (with the money going to WBAI) in touch with one 
another by postcard, but after this, you are on your own in- 
sofar as arranging for pick-up and delivery of items. 

— oddly enough, much of the so-called WBAI inefficiency 
in barter was not our fault. We received many phony offers, 
who naturally could not be contacted by the people who took 
them in good faith. WBAI receives several thousand offers, 
and verifying them all is, naturally, impossible. 

— therefore, we ask those people who plan to take barter 
items to contact the donor and receive the item BEFORE 
sending their checks to WBAI. We're using the honor system 
in this respect, and we assume you will send us your money 
after receiving the barter item. 

— if your barter item does fall through, either because it 
was a phony offer, or for other reasons, please do not call 
us about it. There isn't anything we can do — sorry. 

— for those of you who plan to offer barter items for sale 
over WBAI, please DO NOT, UNDER ANY CIRCUM- 
STANCES, bring the item to the station. If it is taken, the 
purchaser will contact you. 



Page 7 

— the barter department takes no responsibility for barter 
items announced and we also retain the right to accept or 
reject certain items at our discretion. 

— only the person who offers the barter item may use its 
value as a tax-deduction, assuming the item is taken. 

— in case you are not familiar with the barter procedure, 
it will be described ad infinitum and in great detail through- 
out the Marathon. 

— there will be a special Barter Department phone number 
to be used by donors and takers. This number will be an- 
nounced frequently during the Marathon. Do not phone the 
regular WBAI phone number for barter items. 

— while the barter department is offered in the spirit of 
fun, there often are some very attractive offers, so it might 
pay to take advantage of them. Once again, though, please 
don't call us after the Marathon about barter items, and don't 
send us the money for barter items until you have them. 




P»<.11. &a^■l«•' 2>«r*. 





will i»e ««»owne«i'> 




Firfj. It - 1"*. flM***^*^ l»«r^tr ii^nt. 




-J". 



In closing, I sincerely hope that this Marathon will be clean, 
quiet, well-stocked with gourmet food (distributed by Jeanne, 
the kitchen lady), and uncomplicated by broken switchboards, 
broken bones, lost children, and inability to complete the 
Sunday crossword puzzle. On our part, we'll try to make it 
— if not interesting, orderly and short, at least less boring, less 
messy and less long. On your part, please help us by pledging 
your money, and following up your pledge by sending us your 
money. Good luck to us all. 



WBAI 



Page 8 

THE MARATHON: DAY-BY-DAY 
RUN-DOWN 

Friday, May 1 We should have at least 
$5,000 in the till by midnight. 
Saturday, May 2 Day two. We need 
another $10,000 by tonight. Relief in- 
cludes Marshall Efron's Satirical View 
at 9:45 a.m., and a suprise from the 
Public Affairs Department. 
Sunday, May 3 The third Day. Today's 
goal is another $10,000. If we're on 
schedule, we'll cut to Free Music Store 
(Henry Shuman's chamber music for 
and with instruments) at 8:30 p.m. 
Monday, May 4 Day four. Today we're 
asking you for another $8,000. Paul 
Fischer's Newscast will be auctioned off 
at 6:15, and if we've made a dent on 
the back debt to Agence France Presse, 
Military Monitor will be heard at 8:30 
p.m., and the War Summary at 10:45 
p.m. 

Tuesday, May 5 Fifth Day. Today's 
goal is another $8,000. Tonight at 6:15, 
we'll throw in a few segments of the 
Newscast, and Barter may offer a few 
segments of Paul Fischer himself. Also, 
a surprise from Drama and Literature 
at 8:30 p.m. and War Summary at 
10:45 p.m. 

Wednesday, May 6 The Sixth Day, with 
a goal of another $7,000. If all goes 
well, we have four programs planned, 
the Newscast at 6:15 p.m., Confron- 
tation: Washington at 8:30 p.m., the 
War Summary at 10:45 p.m. and, some 
time in the middle of the night, a new 
program called Non-Event of the Day, 
which is coverage of same. 
Thursday, May 7 Seventh Day, but not 



a day of rest. Today we want another 
$6,000 from you, and will reward you 
with the Newscast at 6:15, a Public 
Affairs Special at 8:30 p.m., and the 
War Summary at 10:45 p.m. 
Friday, May 8 Eighth Day, with a goal 
of at least another $8,000. We plan to 
auction off segments of the following 
programs: Newscast with Paul Fischer 
at 6:15 p.m., Capitol News Summary at 
7:30 p.m., and a Free Music Store, live 
from the church (tonight, Gerardo Levy 
conducts the Caecilian Chamber En- 
semble) beginning at 8:30 p.m. 
Saturday, May 9 Ninth Day, and all we 
ask is another measly $8,000. Hard-sell 
will be temporarily softened by Marshall 
Efro,nf| and Satirical View at 9:45 a.m., 
and again at 8:30 p.m. when we'll bring 
you bits and pieces of the Free Music 
Store, which is a cello, flute and harpsi- 
chord group called Bach's Uncle. 
Sunday, May 10 With only 5 days left 
to the Marathon, all we ask is another 
$8,000. At 4 p.m., we'll sell you another 
new program called What Do You Do 
and Doesn't It Do Something To Your 
Head?, which is a sort of What's My 
Line? without the questions. At 8:30 
p.m., we may just play you parts of 
another Free Music Store, Brooks 
Tillitson's horn and chamber ensemble. 
Or we may not. 

Monday, May 11 The 11th day, and 
we want you to fork out another $7,000. 
We'll consider broadcanting another 
Non-Event of the Day at 2:00 p.m.; 
similarly, a Newscast at 6:15 if Paul 
Fischer thinks we've brought in what 
he's worth, a Caveat Emptor at 8:30 
p.m., and maybe even a War Summary 



at 10:45 p.m. 

Tuesday, May 12 If we're to reach our 
goal in time, we need another $7,000 
today. Among the pauses that refresh 
that may be broadcast are another What 
Do You Do. . .? at 11:00 a.m., the 
Newscast at 6:15 p.m., an Arts Special 
at 8:30 p.m., and, of course, the War 
Summary at 10:45 p.m. 
Wednesday, May 13 the 13th day, and 
we want another $8,000. Today we 
plan to auction off the Newscast at 
6:15, Judicial Review at 8:30 p.m., and 
the War Summary at 10:45 p.m. 
Thursday, May 14, the next-to-last day. 
You (yes, you personally), must provide 
another $10,000 if you want to hear the 
Newscast (6:15 p.m.), a Public Affairs 
Special which will be very special (8:30 
p.m.) and the War Summary at its usual 
time. 

Friday, May 15 THE LAST DAY, and 

in case you can't add, we need a mere 
$15,000 to reach our goal of $125,000. 
If things look good, we'll auction the 
Newscast, along with the remains of 
Paul Fischer at 6:15 p.m. Capitol News 
Summary at 7:30 p.m. will be aired if 
Bookie and Hinty are satisfied with the 
way things are going, and the War Sum- 
mary will be given, free of charge, to 
the highest bidder at 10:45 p.m. 
For those of you who like such things, 
there will be a Free Music Store, of 
which segments may be broadcast, be- 
ginning around 8:30 p.m. It will feature 
Two Pianos Four Hands with Mike 
Sahl and Phillip Corner. Then, IT'S 
ALL OVER WHEN WE REACH 
$125,000 (until next time). 




I WBAI 

" SATURDAY, MAY 16 

8:00 SYMPHONIES NO. 1 MENDELSSOHN, 
MAHLER (with the "Blumine" Move- 
ment); the Cleveland Orchestra under 
Louis Lane and the Philadelphia Or- 
chestra under Eugene Ormandy. 

9:30 WAR SUMMARY and NEWS (5/15) 

9:45 MISCELLANY 

10:00 PYP Ronny Watkins finally gets to 
greet May. 

11:00 TALKING POLITICS with Neal Free 
man. (5/1) 

11:15 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY The 
past week in Washington as seen by the 
Pacifica Washington bureau. (5/15) 

11:45 TECHIE TIME But is there really 
time for techies, even in stereo? 

12:00 THE ZEN CHEF Mystically trans- 
ported to your kitchen. 

12:15 MISCELLANY 

12:30 LUNCHPAIL Paul Gorman is Lunch- 
pail — or is it Lunchpain? Call OX 7-8506 
for the answer. 

2:00 TWO HOURS OF JAZZ presented by 
Jack McKinney. 

4:00 LET IT ALL HANG OUT Rhythms and 
arhythms, loud and soft, including: 
ROLDAN Two Ritmicas HARRISON 
Canticle No. 1 RUSSELL Three Dance 
Movements COWELL Ostinato Pianis- 
simo RUSSELL Three Cuban Pieces 
CAGE and HARRISON Double Music 
CAGE Amores. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS with Sam 
Julty. (5/17) 

7:00 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIODICALS 
Examined by William Mandel. (KPFA) 
(5/17) 

7:30 THEATRE NEW YORK with Ann Ri- 
vers. (5/17) 

8:00 THE MARIAN MC PARTLAND PRO- 
GRAM With and about Dave Brubeck. 

9:00 SOUND OF TALKING James Purdy 
reads his short story. (5/17) 

9:30 YOUR MOTHER SHOULD KNOW: 
Jazz and Pop from the 20s and 30s 
Jelly Roll Morton, Meade Lux Lewis, 
Jimmie Lunceford, McKinney's Cotton 
Pickers, Wingy Manone, Red and Miff 
Mole's Stompers, Mezz Mezzrow. 

10:00 AN INTERVIEW WITH HUEY NEWT- 
ON The founder of the Black Panther 
Party for Self-Defense talks with KPFA's 
Elsa Knight Thompson at the Alameda 
County Jail in Oakland on May, 21, 
1968. (AL 736) 

11:15 NEW MUSIC FROM LONDON HA 
RRISON BIRTWHISTLE Ring a Dumb 
Carillon DAVID BEDFORD Come in Here, 
Child RICHARD ORTON Cycle PETER 
MEXWELL DAVIES Antechrist. With the 
Pierrot Players under Davies and as- 
sorted soloists. 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE with Steve Post. 

SUNDAY, MAY 17 

8:00 MAHLER'S SECOND Recorded by 
Edith Mathis, Norma Procter, and the 
Chorus and Orchestra of the Bavarian 
Radio under Rafael Kubelik. 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES 



with the late Dr. Henry Cowell, on the 
music of Japan. 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES with the late An- 
thony Boucher. Recordings of soprano 
Celestina Boninsegna. 

10:30 GERMANY TODAY 

10:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS (5/16) 

11:00 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIODICALS: 
William Mandel, (5/16) 

11:30 THEATRE NEW YORK: Ann Rivers. 
(5/16) 

12:00 MIDEASTERN REPORT Dale Minor 
reports on his two-week assignment in 
Israel at the time of the Six-Day War. 
(AL 733) 

1:00 FREE MUSIC STORE: A Harpsichord 
Recital by Igor Kipnis. A demonstration 
of the instrument followed by FROBER- 
GER Suite No. 26 in B Minor KUHNAU 
The Battle between David and Goliath 
HAYDN Sonata No. 13 in G Major BACH 
Toccata in C Minor CHRISTOPHER ED- 
MUNDS Suite in G (1960) NED ROREM 
Spiders (1968, dedicated to Kipnis) 
D. SCARLATTI Five Sonatas RAMEAU 
Fanfarinette, La Triomphante, Gavotte, 
and Five Doubles. Recorded by John 
Ackley. In stereo. 

3:00 ARCHITECTURE AND THE COMMU- 
NITY A symposium of Harold K. Bell, 
I. M. Pei, Frederick P. Rose, and Her- 
man Wrice moderated by J. Max Bond, 
Jr., conducted on Feb. 24 at Cooper 
Union. 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY Last week's Bob 
spruced up for today. 

5:00 THE ABORTION HANDBOOK Patricia 
Magginnis, joint author of the hand- 
book published by Contact, talks about 
women and medicine with Elsa Knight 
Thompson. (KPFA) 

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC (5/18) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 BOOKS A review of current non- 
fiction. (5/18) 

7:00 AFRICA SPEAKS FOR ITSELF with 
Artur Vilankulu. (5/18) 

7:30 SOUND OF TALKING James Purdy 
reading his story by that name. (5/16) 

8:00 BEFORE YOU TRUST IN CRITICS 
Doris Hering, dance critic for Dance 
Magazine, is interviewed by Baird 
Searles. (5/18) 

8:30 WAGNER'S TANNHAUSER The recent 
DGG recording made in East Berlin with 
Birgit Nilsson, Wolfgang Windgassen, 
Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Theo Adam, 
the Chorus and Orchestra of the Berlin 
Deutsche Oper. 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Steve Post's Gotter- 
dammerung. 

MONDAY, MAY 18 

7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry on matters 
of social significance and personal 
trivia. 

9:00 BOOKS A repeat of last night's re- 
view. (5/17) 

9:15 MORNING MUSIC: Septets. (4/27) 

10:30 AFRICA SPEAKS FOR ITSELF with 
Artur Vilankulu. (5/17) 

11:00 BEFORE YOU TRUST IN CRITICS 
Dance critic Doris Hering is interviewed 
by Baird Searles. (5/17) 



Page 9 

11:30 YOUR OLDER SISTER SHOJJLD 
KNOW Danny and the Jrs., Buddy Hol- 
ly, the Platters, the Crickets, etc. 

12:00 STRANGE BEDFELLOWS Juxtaposed 
readings from curious pairs. 

12:15 THE WORD Readings of long or 
short works of fiction. 

12:30 MISCELLANY 

12:45 KRAPP'S LAST TAPE Donald Davis 
performs Beckett's famous monologue. 
Originally produced by Theatre 1960 
and Harry Joe Brown, Jr., at the Prov- 
incetown Playhouse, this performance 
was directed by Alan Schneider. 
(Spoken Arts recording) 

1:30 COUNTRY MUSIC (5/17) 

2:00 EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE AND 
MEDICAL WRITING Today's youth must 
be a hunter in a total environment, 
says media savant Marshall McLuhan. 
Still tied to Gutenberg, editor Morris 
Fishbein offers advice on style to aspir- 
ing medical writers. (Midway 1308) 

3:00 YOUR MOTHER SHOULD KNOW Cab 
Calloway sings Minnie the Moocher and 
other oldies. 

3:30 PYP Welcome to Kid Stuff— under 
its new name of Alphabet Soup. 

4:30 AFTERNOON MUSIC: Greek. SATIE 
Socrate; antique Greek musik. (5/21) 

5:45 MISCELLANY 

6:00 RENT AND HOUSING IN THE CITY 
Members of the Metropolitan Council 
on Housing report on the newest hous- 
ing crisis. (5/19) 

6:15 NEWS 

Newcast by Paul Fischer 
Shoptalk with guest journalists 
City: examination of local issues. 

7:15 MILITARY MONITOR The D.C. Bureau 
closes in on the Pentagon. (5/19) 

7:45 FREE VOICE OF GREECE News, 
music, and comment on Greek politics 
by Greeks and U.S. friends of Greek 
democracy. (5/19) 

8:00 GREAT ARTISTS IN AMERICA TODAY 
Jeanne Siegel interviews Robert Morris 
on his current retrospective at the 
Whitney Museum. (5/21) 

8:30 FALLING APART The disintegration 
of the whole world as seen through the 
eyes of BAI's staff. (5/19) 

9:00 *FOLK POEMS AND SONGS OF VIET- 
NAM Most Vietnamese are farmers, 
and these works come from that tra- 
dition. Participants Nguyen Ngoc Bich, 
Andrea Miller, and Steve Addiss sing 
or read in this first program of a festival 
of Asian literature, The Literature of 
Asia: Poetry, Story, and Song. 

9:30 *PROTEST EXTRA Reports on anti- 
war, antidraft, antitax, and other anti- 
anything protests. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer 
and LATE NEWS. (5/19) 

11:00 PA'LANTE The Young Lords and 
their guests with commentary in Eng- 
lish and Spanish. (5/19) 

11:30 *THE SUBTLE ART OF REJECTION 
Some of the world's greatest but as 
yet undiscovered writers read their 
favorite rejection notices. Produced by 
Gil Jardine of D&L. (5/20) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE The world's 
most undiscovered, least-known writer, 
Robert the Fass. 



Page 10 



WBAI 



TUESDAY, AAAY 19 

7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry visits with 
Lamparski's grandmother. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY and NEWS (5/18) 

9:15 MORNING MUSIC: Octets. (4/28) 

10:30 RENT AND HOUSING IN THE CITY 
by Met Council on Housing. (5/18) 

10:45 FREE VOICE OF GREECE Both news 
and music. (5/18) 

11:00 MILITARY MONITOR (5/18) 

11:30 PA'LANTE Commentary by the 
Young Lords. (5/18) 

12:00 STRANGE BEDFELLOWS Readings 
from works not usually coupled. 

12:15 THE WORD Long or short works of 
fiction read aloud. 

12:30 LUNCHPAIL Paul Gorman has a 
rotten apple in his. Complaints regis- 
tered at OX 7-8506. 

2:30 ENVIRONMENTAL OUTRAGES What 
ever Ladybird overlooked. 

3:00 FALLING APART Whatever everyone 
overlooks. (5/18) 

3:30 *PYP Ellen Jaffe presents a special 
program, "The Voice of the Children," 
poetry by those most honest of all peo- 
ple, children. 

4:30 AFTERNOON MUSIC: Avant-garde 
piano. Works by BERIO and STOCK- 
HAUSEN played by David Burge, XEN- 
AKIS and BROWN played by Juji Ta- 
kahashi. (5/28) 

5:45 MISCELLANY 

6:00 COMMENTARY by Victor Perlo, eco- 
nomist. (5/20) 

6:15 NEWS 

Newscast by Paul Fischer 
Shoptalk with guest journalists 

7:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A current 
event covered by the P.A. Dept. (5/20) 

7:45 REPORT TO THE LISTENER by who 
ever's in charge by this time. (5/20) 

8:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . Anna 
Q. Nilsson? Richard Lamparski inter- 
views the silent star about the 1925 
accident that ended her career. (5/20) 

8:30 THE GREAT PROLETARIAN CUL- 
TURAL REVOLUTION Julius Lester takes 
over the station — at least, for the 
nonce. Phone him at OX 7-8506. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer 
and LATE NEWS. (5/20) 

11:00 THE INSURGENTS: Lawyers. (5/20) 

11:30 PANDIT PRAN NATH Ragini Bagesh 
wari ("Restlessness in Memory of God 
Consciousness") with Fiyaz Khan, tabla. 
(5/20) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Restlessness 
all night long. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20 

7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry crosses 



the thin line between rationality and 
insanity. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY and NEWS (5/19) 

9:15 MORNING MUSIC: Solos. (4/29) 

10:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER (5/19) 

10:45 COMMENTARY by economist Victor 
Perlo. (5/19) 

11:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . ? Richard 
Lamparksi and his guests. (5/19) 

11:30 THE INSURGENTS: Lawyers. (5/19) 

12:00 STRANGE BEDFELLOWS Pairs of 
works by people usually not paired. 

12:15 THE WORD Readings from fiction 
both long and short. 

12:30 MISCELLANY 

12:45 THE SUBTLE ART OF REJECTION 
Readings by writers. (5/18) 

1:15 PANDIT PRAN NATH Ragini Bagesh- 
wari. (5/19) 

1:45 THE URBAN CONDITION— CRITICAL 
MASS? U. of Chicago Professor Julian 
Levi on the urban racial issue and 
Laboratory Director Edwin Goldwasser 
on use of scientific research funds. 
(Midway 1309) 

2:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL Repeated 
from 5/19. 

3:30 PYP Meet Bob Cohen, the Friendly 
Spirit! 

4:30 AFTERNOON MUSIC: Sonatas. BEE 
THOVEN "Hammerklavier" performed 
by Ogdon. (5/27) 

5:45 MISCELLANY 

6:15 NEWS 

Newscast by Paul Fischer 

Shoptalk with guest journalists 

City: an in-depth look at a local issue. 

7:15 CONFRONTATION: WASHINGTON 
Covering current events in the nation's 
capital. (5/21) 

7:45 FILMS IN FOCUS with Andrew Sarris, 
film critic for the Village Voice. (5/21) 

8:15 WOMANKIND Nanette Rainone and 
guests from the Feminist Movement. 
(5/21) 

8:45 AT THE RISK OF SEEMING RIDICU- 
LOUS Music and commentary on the 
current state of absolutely everything. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer 
and LATE NEWS. (5/21) 

11:00 THE INSURGENTS An open pro- 
gram. (5/21) 

11:30 *AUDIO ORGANUM III for seven 
sound sources. The debut performance 
of the BAI music-theatre ensemble di- 
rected and mixed by Salzman and 
Kavanaugh; with Imogen Foote and 
Janet Steele (sopranos), Janet Sullivan 
(mezzo-soprano), and Bill Zukof (coun- 



ter-tenor). Stereo broadcast. " 

11:45 MISCELLANY 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Radio's long- 
est Miscellany. 

THURSDAY, MAY 21 

7:00 IN THE BEGINNING 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY and NEWS (5/20) 

9:15 MORNING MUSIC: Greek. (5/18) 

10:30 WOMANKIND: Nanette Rainone. 
(5/20) 

11:00 FILMS IN FOCUS with Andrew 
Sarris. (5/20) 

11:30 THE INSURGENTS (5/20) 

12:00 STRANGE BEDFELLOWS Pairs of 
works read aloud. 

12:15 THE WORD Fiction long and short. 

12:30 LUNCHPAIL with Paul Gorman, who 
answers OX 7-8506 when you call. 

2:30 CONFRONTATION: WASHINGTON 
(5/20) 

3:00 GREAT ARTISTS IN AMERICA TODAY 
Robert Morris interviewed by Jeanne 
Siegel. (5/18) 

3:30 PYP Once upon a time there was a 
Watkins Rock . . . 

4:30 AFTERNOON MUSIC SCHNEBEL 
Glossolalia CAGE Atlas. (5/29) 

5:30 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Bui 
letins about (what else?) community 
happenings. (5/22) 

5:45 MISCELLANY 

6:00 SCIENCE COMMENTARY by Glenn 
Paulson. (5/22) 

6:15 NEWS 

Newcast by Paul Fischer 
Shoptalk with guest journalists. 

7:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL Coverage 
of a current political event. (5/22) 

8:00 HOMOSEXUAL NEWS (5/22) 

8:15 THE MOVIES Hosted by author and 
critic Joseph Gelmis, currently chair- 
man of the N.Y. Film Critics. (5/22) 

8:45 RED BEANS, RICE AND OTHER 
TOPICAL ISSUES Neal Conan's dinner 
menu. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer 
and LATE NEWS. (5/22) 

11:00 THE ECOLOGY OF BELIEF Food for 
your soul. Based on the assumption 
that psychic darkness has wiped out 
the sane art of belief. Eastern religion, 
Jung, meditation, the occult, psyche- 
delics, and the failure of major religions 
are covered in readings, interviews, or 
via music. (5/22) 

11:30 ON SCREEN Milton Hoffman and 
other young lovers — of film and TV, 
that is — review and discuss the media. 
(5/22) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE 



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WBAI 



Page 11 










FRIDAY, MAY 22 

7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Anyone up this 
early deserves Larry's grumbling. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY and NEWS (5/21) 

9:15 MORNING MUSIC: Mozart. (4/30) 

10:15 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD An 
nouncements originally made (5/21). 

10:30 SCIENCE COMMENTARY: Paulson. 
(5/21) 

10:45 HOMOSEXUAL NEWS (5/21) 

11:00 THE MOVIES (5/21) 

11:30 THE ECOLOGY OF BELIEF On re 
ligion. (5/21) 

12:00 STRANGE BEDFELLOWS Two ide 
ological strangers united in a reading. 

12:15 THE WORD The fictional word. 

12:30 ON SCREEN: Hoffman. (5/21) 

1:00 MAHLER'S FIFTH Sir John Barbirolli 
conducts the New Philharmonia Orches- 
tra in a new recording. 

2:15 MISCELLANY 

2:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL (5/21) 

3:30* PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
More Just So Stories read by that old 
rhinoceros himself, Sheldon Rudolph. 

4:30 AFTERNOON MUSIC: Italian. MEN 
DELSSOHN "Italian" Symphony. (5/25) 

5:45 MISCELLANY 

6:00 TALKING POLITICS with Neal Free- 
man. (5/23) 

6:15 NEWS 

Newscast by Paul Fischer 

City: a close-up on a local issue. 

7:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY A review 
of the week's events in D.C. by the 
Washington Bureau. (5/23) 

7:30 A SATIRICAL VIEW by Marshall 
Efron. (5/23) 

7:45 TECHIE TIME A techiein-stereo pres- 
entation. (5/23) 

8:00 ARTS EXTRA An hour left open for 
covering recent developments in the 
arts. (5/25) 

9:00 *CHINESE PROTEST POETRY: From 
the Earliest Times through the Sung 
Dynasty. A reading and commentary by 
Burton Watson of Columbia. He traces 
the Chinese tradition of social and poli- 
tical criticism from 600 B.C. through 
13th-century poetry. 



9:30 DIMENSIONS IN BLACK SOUND 

Bob Northern with Ron Carter in a 
program dedicated to the memory of 
Eric Dolphy. (5/24) 

10:30 *JOEL CHADABE: Rendezvous. 
Composed at the new electronic music 
studio at the State U. at Albany. In 
stereo. (5/27) 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer 
and LATE NEWS. (5/23) 

11:00 BLACK AWARENESS Dolores Cos 
tello and guests. 

11:30 *ECO-MUSIC Urban Decay meets 
Mother Nature in the cataclysmic mod- 
ern music drama by Dan Kavanaugh 
and Peter Zanger. In stereo, from Feb- 
ruary's Ecology Day. (5/24) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE From the 
music of ecology to the music of the 
spheres. 

SATURDAY, MAY 23 

8:00 MAHLER'S SEVENTH Leonard Berns- 
tein and the New York Philharmonic. 

9:30 WAR SUMMARY and NEWS (5/22) 

9:45 A SATIRICAL VIEW by Marshall 
Efron. (5//22) 

10:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
Let the sun shine in; meet Ronny 
WatkinsI 

11:00 TALKING POLITICS With Neal Free 
man. (5/22) 

11:15 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY From 
the Washington Bureau. (5/22) 

11:45 TECHIE TIME In stereo. (5/22) 

12:00 THE ZEN CHEF Li-Min Mo, an Ori- 
ental Child. 

12:15 MISCELLANY 

12:30 LUNCHPAIL A picnic basketful, at 
OX 7-8506. 

2:00 THE CHILDREN'S THEATER at the 
Hour of the Been Dere. 

4:00 LET IT ALL HANG OUT Songs of In- 
nocence and Experience by William 
Blake "tuned" by Alan Ginsberg and 
friends. MAHLER Third Symphony 
("Nature" Symphony) with the Utah 
Symphony conducted by Maurice Abrav- 
anel. 



6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS Sam Julty 
on the problems of driving in the city. 
(5/24) 

7:15 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIODICALS 
William Mandel examines USSR Publi- 
cations. (KPFA) (5/24) 

7:30 THEATRE NEW YORK Ann Rivers and 
guests from off-B'way. (5/24) 

8:00 DONAUESCHINGEN FESTIVAL #1 
Three world premieres from the 1969 
program: BERIO Sinfonia for 8 Voices 
and Orchestra ALFRED SCHNITTKE Pi- 
anissimo for Large Orchestra MANUEL 
ENRIQUEZ IxamatI for Orchestra. David 
Berger hosts, and performers are the 
Swingle Singers and the Southwest 
German Radio Orchestra under Ernest 
Bour. Stereo b'cast. Part #2 — (5/30) 

9:00 *LETTERS OF A JAVANESE PRINCESS 
Jane Maria Robbins portrays Indonesia's 
national heroine, Kartini. Although 
Kartini died at the age of 24, she be- 
came famous through her writings as 
a spokeswoman for Indonesian nation- 
alist aspirations. 

9:45 *THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: There's 
a Little Ambiguity Over There Among 
the Bluebells A series of poem-plays 
by Ruth Krauss make up this final 
production by the Word Players. Pub- 
lished by Something Else Press and 
used by the author's kind permission, 
the book is a sampler "disorganized to 
turn you on the possibilities of selec- 
tion and juxtaposition . . ." specialities 
of the Word Players, who are David 
Haight, Susan Miller, Sherry Pockell, 
rtnn Rivers, Julie Scherer, and Edgar 
Walker. Directed by Baird Searles; tech- 
nical production by David Rapkin. 
(5/24) 

10:30 AVANT-GARDE JAZZ with Rash led 
AM. Works of Coltrane, Sonny Murray, 
et al. D.J. is Coltrane's drummer. 
(5/27) 

11:30 EVENTIDE Author James Purdy 
reads his story of that name. 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Derriere-garde D.J. 
Steve Post. 



Page 12 

SUNDAY, MAY 24 

8:00 MAHLER'S NINTH Recorded in the 
Mormon Tabernacle (now would we kid 
you?) by Maurice Abravanel and the 
Utah Symphony. 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES 
Ethnic music presented by the late Dr. 
Henry Coweli, from the Archives. Eng- 
lish and pygmy music. 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES The late Anthony 
Boucher's recordings of Evan Williams. 
(KPFA Archives) 

10:30 GERMANY TODAY Arts and letters 
in West Germany. 

10:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS: Julty. 
(5/23) 

11:15 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIODICALS: 
Mandel. (5/23) 

11:30 THEATRE NEW YORK: Rivers. 
(5/23) 

12:00 MAHLER'S SIXTH Rafael Kubelik 
conducts the Symphony Orchestra of 
the Bavarian Radio. 

1:45 MISCELLANY 

2:00 ^DIMENSIONS IN BLACK SOUND 
Carter and Northern. (5/22) 

3:00 THE INFORMATION UTILITY: Public 
Interest and Political Process Irving 
Bengelsdorf, science editor of the Los 
Angeles Times, on computer invasion 
of life. U. of Chicago Professor Kenneth 
Prewitt on electronic encouragement to 
small political groups. (Midway 1310) 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY Bob Pass, non 
computerized just left over from last 
week. 

5:00 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: There's 
a Little Ambiguity Over There Among 
the Bluebells. Program details in the 
listing of 5/23. 

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC BAI's nod to the 
growth of the C&W field. (5/25) 

5:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 BOOKS A review of current non- 
fiction. (5/25) 

7:00 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS David 
Rothenberg and members of the For- 
tune Society discuss prison conditions. 
(5/25) 

7:30 *ECO-MUSIC A Kavanaugh-Zanger 
production in stereo. (5/22) 

8:00 BEFORE YOU TRUST IN CRITICS Ju 
dith Crist, film critic from NBC's Today 
Shov/, New York Magazine, and TV 
GUIDE, is interviewed by Al Lees, film 
critic for WBAI. (5/25) 

8:30 FROM LONDON Theatrical producer 
and director Roger Simon comments 
on theatre in that city. (5/25) 

8:45 THEATER REVIEW by Isaiah Sheffer. 
(5/25) 

9:00 *TIBETAN FOLK TALES Retold by 
John Brzostoski, these stories were 
part of the oral tradition, passed along 
from generation to generation. 

9:30 AN EVENING WITH HEINRICH ISAAC 
#1 Songs and instrumentals performed 
by the Columbia U. Collegium Musicum 
under Richard Taruskin. Recorded at 
Casa Italiana by Steve Von Hassein and 
Adam Griswoid. Part Two at 11:15 to- 
night. 

10:15 A CONVERSATION WITH JOHN 
CAGE A discussion of the composer's 
recent activities; interviewer is Richard 



Friedman. Stereo broadcast. (5/27) 
11:15 AN EVENING WITH HEINRICH 
ISAAC #2 From the same concert heard 
earlier the evening. ISAAC Missa Quant 
j'ay au cuer with the Proper for the 
Feast of the Holy Trinity from Choralis 
Constantinus. 
12:00 THE OUTSIDE Steve Post makes 
his own strange kind of music. 

MONDAY, MAY 25 

7:00 IN THE BEGINNING with Larry the 
Dee Jay. 

9:00 BOOKS A review. (5/24) 

9:15 MORNING MUSIC: Italian. MEN 
DELSSOHN "Italian Symphony." 
(5/22) 

10:30 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS with 
David Rothenberg. (5/24) 

11:00 BEFORE YOU TRUST IN CRITICS 
See details in listing for 5/24. 

11:30 FROM LONDON: Roger Simon 
(5/24) 

11:45 THEATER REVIEW: Isaiah Sheffer. 
(5/24) 

12:00 STRANGE BEDFELLOWS Unusual 
combinations of written works. 

12:15 THE WORD Reading or performance 
of a work of fiction. 

12:30 ARTS EXTRA A current art event. 
(5/22) 

1:30 COUNTRY MUSIC Produced by BAI 
engineer Tom Whitmore. (5/24) 

2:00 WALTER LOWENFELS The poet read 
ing his works at NYU. 

2:30 AMERICAN INDIAN MUSIC Music of 
the Indians of the Southwest. 

3:30 PYP Welcome to Dialog with Richard 
Schiffman. 

4:30 AFTERNOON MUSIC: Scottish. MEN- 
DELSSOHN "Scottish" Symphony. (To 
be rebroadcast in June.) 

5:45 MISCELLANY 

6:00 HIGH SCHOOL COMMENTARY High 
School Student Leaders discuss the 
problems of their schools. (5/26) 

6:15 NEWS 

Newscast by Paul Fischer 
. Shoptalk with journalists 
City: coverage of a local issue. 

7:15 CAVEAT EMPTOR Pacifica's D.C. 
bureau gives advice to the consumer. 
(5/26) 

7:45 FREE VOICE OF GREECE With a 
penchant toward the return of de- 
mocracy, news and music of Greece 
are presented. (5/26) 

8:00 HARPSICHORD STUDIO RECITAL by 
Use Foerstel-Bliss. VALENTI La Ro- 
manesca RICHTER Soundings BACH 
Partita in B-Flat SCARLATTI Sonata in 
G RAMEAU Deux Pieces de Clavecin. 
In stereo. 

8:30 FALLING APART Something that is 
disintegrating examined by a staff mem- 
ber who may or may not be in a similar 
state. (5/26) 

9:00 *BURMA: LIFE AND POEMS A poetry 
reading and commentary by Lionel 
Landry of the Asia Society. Mr. Landry, 
who spent five years in Burma, mar- 
ried the daughter of a Burmese news- 
paper publisher. 

9:45 *BALKAN FOLK MUSIC HOUR #4 
Martin Koenig presents music from that 
peninsula — specifically Bulgarian, 
Greek, Rumanian, Yugoslavian, and 



V^BAI 

Turkish music. (5/29) ^ 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer 
and LATE NEWS. (5/26) 

11:00 PA'LANTE Commentary by members 
of the Young Lords and their guests. 
(5/26) 

11:30 RECONCILIATIONS Louis Phillips, 
editor of Prologue Magazine, reads 
poems selected from his recent col- 
lection pertaining to marital experience. 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE But wait till 
you hear about Bob's experiences! 

TUESDAY, MAY 26 

7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry loses the 
battle to stay awake. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY and NEWS (5/25) 

9:15 MORNING MUSIC: Basses and Dou- 
ble basses. HENZE Concerto for Dou- 
ble-bass performed by Gary Karr. 
(5/1) 

10:30 FREE VOICE OF GREECE Music and 
commentary. (5/25) 

10:45 HIGH SCHOOL COMMENTARY 
Students on their problems. (5/25) 

11:00 CAVEAT EMPTOR From the Wash 
ington bureau. (5/25) 

11:30 PA'LANTE On Puerto Rican affairs, 
in English and Spanish. (5/25) 

12:00 STRANGE BEDFELLOWS Readings 
from ideological strangers. 

12:15 THE WORD Performed or read. 

12:30 LUNCHPAIL Paul Gorman may be 
reached at OX 7-8506. 

2:30 ENVIRONMENTAL OUTRAGES Con 
servationists examine the latest. 

3:00 FALLING APART Also outrageous, 
but everything is. (5/25) 

3:30 "^PYP A special program presented by 
Patrick Merla. Fairies, elves, and the 
"little people" — do they really exist? 

4:30 AFTERNOON MUSIC: Clowns. SCHO- 
ENBERG Pierrot Lunaire. (June rebroad- 
cast.) 

5:45 MISCELLANY 

6:00 COMMENTARY by economist Victor 
Perlo. (5/27) 

6:15 NEWS 

Newscast by Paul Fischer 
Shoptalk among journalists. 

7:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A current 
affair — political, that is — brought under 
the scrutiny of the P.A. Dept. (5/27) 

7:45 REPORT TO THE LISTENER Station 
business reported by someone in char- 
ge. Otherwise known as "Is anyone 
minding the store?" (5/27) 

8:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . Winnie 
Lightner? Richard Lamparski visits the 
Hollywood home of one of the great 
funny women of films and stage. 
(5/27) 

8:30 THE GREAT PROLETARIAN CUL- 
TURAL REVOLUTION Julius Lester's 
guests, when he invites one, are from 
the present. He may be reached at 
OX 7-8506. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer 
and LATE NEWS. (5/27) 

11:00 THE INSURGENTS: Churchmen. 
Commentary by late-comers to the 
Movement. (5/27) 

11:30 ''AUDIO ORGANUM II for seven 
sound sources. See 5/20 program list- 
ing for concert details. In stereo. 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Pass's in- 
audible organum. 



WBAI 



Page 13 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 27 

7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Can you hear 
Larry from the bottom of his coffee 
container? 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY and NEWS (5/26) 

9:15 MORNING MUSIC: Sonatas. (5/20) 

10:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER Or 
"Youth Wants to Know." (5/26) 

10:45 COMMENTARY: Victor Perlo. (5/26) 

11:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . ? Ri- 
chard Lamparksi and his guests. (5/26) 

11:30 THE INSURGENTS: Churchmen. 
(5/26) 

12:00 STRANGE BEDFELLOWS Juxtaposi 
tion of works, read aloud. 

12:15 THE WORD Performances or read- 
ings of works of fiction. 

12:30 JOEL CHADABE: Rendezvous. Elec- 
tronic composition in stereo. (5/22) 

12:45 A CONVERSATION WITH JOHN 
CAGE Richard Friedman interviews the 
composer. In stereo. (5/24) 

1:45 AVANT-GARDE JAZZ: Rashied AN. 
Program notes in listing of 5/23. 

2:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL (5/26) 

3:30 PYP Join Bob Cohen and Sing When 
the Spirit Says Sing. 

4:30 AFTERNOON MUSIC: New recordings. 
(June rebroadcast) 

5:45 MISCELLANY 

6:15 NEWS 

Newscast by Paul Fischer 
Shoptalk with guest journalists 
City: a local issue examined. 

7:15 JUDICIAL REVIEW Recent court de 
cisions examined by Lawrence Speiser. 
(5/28) 
7:45 FILMS IN FOCUS with Andrew Sarris. 

(5/28) 
8:15 WOMANKIND Nanette Rainone and 
members of the feminist movement. 
(5/28) 
8:45 AT THE RISK OF SEEMING RIDICU- 
LOUS Music from that department. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY and LATE NEWS 
with Paul Fischer. (5/28) 

11:00 THE INSURGENTS: Radicals in the 
health profession. (5/28) 

11:30 *AUDIO ORGANUM I in stereo. Con 
cert details in the program listing for 
5/20. 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Fass con 
tinues his organum from last night. 



THURSDAY, MAY 28 

7:00 IN THE BEGINNING The secret ad 

ventures of Larry the J. 
9:00 WAR SUMMARY and NEWS (5/27) 
9:15 MORNING MUSIC: Avant-Garde Pi 

ano. Works listed under 5/19. 
10:30 WOMANKIND: Nanette Rainone. 

(5/27) 





11:00 FILMS IN FOCUS: Andrew Sarris. 
(5/27) 

11:30 THE INSURGENTS: Health prafes 
sionals. (5/27) 

12:00 STRANGE BEDFELLOWS a couple 
of ideological strangers. 

12:15 THE WORD Fictional accounts read 
or performed. 

12:30 LUNCHPAIL When Gorman forgets 
his, the station experiences a crisis. 
Emergency phone no.: OX 7-8506. 

2:30 JUDICIAL REVIEW with Lawrence 
Speiser. (5/27) 

3:00 JAZZ FROM BELGIUM Belgian Radio 
presentations of E. Verschueren, 
Berndt Egerbladh and Nathan Davis. 

3:30 PYP For the last time in May — 
Watkins Rock! 

4:30 AFTERNOON MUSIC STOCKHAUSEN 
Mixtur, Telemusik. (June rebroadcast) 

5:30 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
Events around town open to the public. 
(5/29) 

5:45 MISCELLANY 

6:00 EDUCATION COMMENTARY by Neil 
Postman. (5//29) 

6:15 NEWS 

Newscast by Paul Fischer 
Shoptalk with guest journalists. 

7:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL The PA. 
Dept. on a current event. (5/29) 

8:00 HOMOSEXUAL NEWS (5/29) 

8:15 THE THIRD WORLD Committee of 
Returned Volunteers reports on under- 
developed countries. (5/29) 

8:45 MISCELLANY 

9:00 *THE KOREAN TRADITION Reading 
and commentary by Bonnie R. Crown 
of the Asia Society. The materials all 
deal with relationships: king to subject, 
father to son, and East to West. 

9:30 RED BEANS, RICE AND OTHER TOP- 
ICAL All dealt with by Neal Conan. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer 
and LATE NEWS. (5/29) 

11:00 THE ECOLOGY OF BELIEF On mys 
ticism, the occult, and the failure of 
Western religion. (5/29) 

11:30 ON SCREEN Film and TV are re- 
viewed and discussed by young, authen- 
tic critics. Milton Hoffman is the host. 
(5/29) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE An authentic 
screen personality. Bob Fass. 

FRIDAY, MAY 29 

7:00 IN THE BEGINNING which serves as 

an intro to the broadcast day. 
9:00 WAR SUMMARY and NEWS (5/28) 
9:15 MORNING MUSIC SCHNEBEL Glos- 

solalla CAGE Atlas. (5/21) 
10:15 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 

Announcements of events open to the 

public. (5/28) 



10:30 EDUCATION COMMENTARY by Neil 

Postman. (5/28) 
10:45 HOMOSEXUAL NEWS For and from 

that community. (5/28) 
11:00 THE THIRD WORLD by members 
of the Committee of Returned Volun- 
teers. (5/28) 
11:30 THE ECOLOGY OF BELIEF About 

religion. (5/28) 
12:00 STRANGE BEDFELLOWS Readings 
from curious pairs. 

12:15 THE WORD The fictional word. 

12:30 ON SCREEN Film and TV reviewed 
by Milton Hoffman and guests. (5/28) 

1:00 KATHLEEN CLEAVER Julius Lester 
in conversation with the wife of the 
black leader. (From the Archives) 
1:30 BALKAN FOLK MUSIC HOUR #4 
Martin Koenig with recordings of ethnic 
music. (5/25) 

2:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL Repeated 
from the broadcast of 5/28. 

3:30 *PYP Hear the master story-teller 
himself. Sheldon Rudolph presents sev- 
eral more stories from Rudyard Kip- 
ling's great work. Just So Stories. 

4:30 AFTERNOON MUSIC Old recordings 
by cellist Emmanuel Feuermann. (To 
be rebroadcast in June.) 

5:45 MISCELLANY 

6:00 TALKING POLITICS with Neal Free 
man. (5/30) 

6:15 NEWS 

Newscast by Paul Fischer 
City, local issues 

7:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY A wrap- 
up of the week's events in Washington. 
From the Pacifica bureau there. (5/30) 

7:30 A SATIRICAL VIEW by Marshall Efron. 
(5/30) 

7:45 TECHIE TIME Rapkin and Zanger are 
privy to tape snippets, and they pro- 
duce them in stereo. (5/30) 

8:00 THE MONTH IN REVIEW Presented 
by the editors of Monthly Review Mag- 
azine. 

8:30 INTERVIEW WITH ELDRIDGE CLEAV- 
ER at the Algeirs Festival; VPRO/, Amst- 
erdam. 

9:00 *THE MANYOSHU: Collection for a 
Myriad Ages Commentary and poetry 
reading by Professor Carl Schmidt of 
NYU, illustrating how the oldest of 
Japanese anthologies influenced sub- 
sequent literature. 

9:45 ARTS EXTRA An hour left open for 
covering recent developments in the 
arts. (6/1) 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Paul Fischer 
and LATE NEWS. (5/30) 

11:00 BLACK AWARENESS Dolores Cos 
tello with members of the black com- 
munity. 

11:30 CHALIAPIN #5 KPFA's Larry Jack- 
son continues his series on the great 
Russian basso. (5/31) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE And this is 
outro. 




Page 14 
SATURDAY, AAAY 30 

8:00 CHERUBINI'S IL CRESCENDO In an 

Italian Radio performance by Elena 
Rizzierl, Angelo Marchiandi, Guido Maz- 
zini, Renato Cesari, and Mario Guggia, 
with the "Alessandro Scarlatti" Orches- 
tra of RAI (Naples) and the "Coro Po- 
lifonico" of Naples under Franco Ca- 
racciolo. In stereo. 
9:30 WAR SUMMARY and NEWS (5/29) 
9:45 A SATIRICAL VIEW: Efron. (5/29) 
10:00 PYP Spend an hour with Ronny 

Watkins. 
11:00 TALKING POLITICS: Freeman. 

(5/29) 
11:15 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY The 

past week in Washington. (5/29) 
11:45 TECHIE TIME In stereo. (5/29) 
12:00 THE ZEN CHEF Oriental cookery 

with Li-MJn Mo. 
12:15 MISCELLANY 

12:30 LUNCHPAIL Wiping out the system 
with Paul Gorman's shirt. 

2:00 TWO HOURS OF FOLK MUSIC Pre 
sented by Izzy Young. 

4:00 LET IT ALL HANG OUT Featuring 
the fabulous first recording of PAUL 
HINDEMITH's opera Cardillac, with 
Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (Cardillac), 
Leonore Kirschstein (the Daughter), 
Donald Grobe (the Officer), Karl Chris- 
tian Kohn (the Gold Merchant), Eberh- 
ard Katz (the Courtier), and Elisabeth 
Soederstroem (the Lady). With the Co- 
logne Radio Symphony Orchestra and 
Chorus under Joseph Keilberth. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS Sam Julty 
in his FM custom. (5/31) 

7:00 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIODICALS 
Read in translation and reviewed by 
William Mandel. (KPFA) (5/31) 

7:30 THEATRE NEW YORK Ann Rivers 
with guests from the New Theatre. 
(5/31) 

8:00 DONAUESCHINGEN FESTIVAL, 
PART 2 From the 1969 program. 
BOULEZ Domaines pour Clarinette et 
quelques Instruments HILDA DIANDA 
Ludus I for Orchestra (world premiere) 
ANATOL VIERU Sun Dial for Orchestra 
(world premiere). Performed by clari- 
netist Walter Boeykens and the South- 
west German Radio Orchestra under 
Boulez Bour. Dacid Berger hosts this 
stereo broadcast. 

9:00 *THE GHAZALS OF MIRZA GHALIB: 
A (;entennial Celebration Poetry read in 
Urdu and English by Aijaz Ahmad and 
Adrienne Rich. The last of the truly 
great Urdu poets, Ghalib was also a 
man of decisive historical moment. 

9:45 IN THE SHANK OF THE NIGHT Steve 
Post and Bill Schechner, along with 
various tramps, midnight ramblers, and 
paranoid insomniacs, conduct a tour of 
little-known places to go after 3 a.m. 
Recorded at selected locations. 

10:45 RENAISSANCE NOTES Music and 
talk, with Professor Joel Newman of 
the Columbia Music Dept. 



11:45 MEET THE BEATLES! Recordings of 
I Want to Hold Your Hand, et al. 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Meet Steve Post if 
you can stand it. 

SUNDAY, MAY 31 

8:00 SCHUBERT Songs performed by Ju- 
dith Raskin. The B-Flat Sonata, Op. 
Post., performed by Wilhelm Kempff. 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES 
The late Dr. Henry Cowell presents 
Chinese and Iranian music. (From the 
Archives) 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES with the late An- 
thony Boucher. Ercerpts from Kurt 
Weill's Street Scene. 

10:30 GERMANY TODAY David Berger on 
art and literature in that country. 

10:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS: Julty. 
(5/30) 

11:00 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIODICALS 
(5/30) 

11:30 THEATRE NEW YORK with Ann 
Rivers. (5/30) 

12:00 *THE LONG RUSSIAN WINTER: 
May Night. The Rimsky-Korsakov opera 
composed in 1878. Produced by Kathy 
Dobkin. 

2:30 CHALIAPIN #5 Larry Jackson's series 
on the basso. (5/29) 

3:00 THE MYTH OF THE ARTIST Art critic 
Harold Rosenberg of the New Yorker is 
interviewed by Joseph Shapiro of the 
Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art. 
Discussion centers of the artist's medi- 
um vs. the content of the work. (Mid- 
way 1311) 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY If you can't stay 
up for him, Bob will not be denied you. 

5:00 *A PRESS CONFERENCE WITH FE- 
DERICO FELLINI After a screening of 
Fellini Satyricon the Italian film master 
answered the questions of an audience 
composed of college students and pro- 
fessors. Produced by Milton Hoffman. 
(6/1) 

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC Produced by Tom 
Whitmore. (6/1) 



Wl 



6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 BOOKS Reviews of current non- 
fiction works. (6/1) 

7:00 AFRICA SPEAKS FOR ITSELF Host 
Arthur Vilankulu discusses that conti- 
nent with his guests. (6/1) 

7:30 RAID ON THE WHITE TIGER REGI- 
MENT Excerpts from the new Chinese 
opera performed by the Peking Opera. 
Watch for The East Is Red, the uncut 
opera coming soon at your local radio 
station. 

8:00 BEFORE YOU TRUST IN CRITICS 
Joseph Morgenstern, film critic for 
Newsweek, is interviewed by Milton 
Hoffman, BAI's TV critic. (6/1) 

8:30 QUOTATIONS FROM CHAIRMAN 
MAO SET TO MUSIC Including "We 
should support whatever the enemy op- 
poses and oppose whatever the enemy 
supports"; " A revolution is not a din- 
ner party"; and others. From the China 
Record Company, Peking, China. 

9:00 *THE GHAZALS OF MIRZA GHALIB 
IN MUSIC Musical settings and readings 
in translation by Andrea Miller. The 
musicians include Brij Saxena, Ranjeet 
and Snajeet (his sons), and Bihari 
Sharma. This is the last in the series 
The Literature of Asia: Poetry, Story, 
and Song. 

9:45 *SCIENTISTS SPEAK OUT: Earth Day, 
1970 Representatives of the Environ- 
mental Action Coalition discuss the 
significance of Earth Day for New York 
City and the rest of the nation. Glenn 
Paulson of the Scientists' Committee 
for Public Information moderates. (June 
rebroadcast) 

10:45 JAZZ, ETC. Eric Raeburn with guest 
Tony Williams, drummer and composer. 
The Tony Williams Lifetime, Williams' 
new band, will be heard on recording. 

11:45 THE POETRY OF DONNA DICK- 
ENSON Maralyn Myers, actress, reads 
the works of the poet and translator. 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE With eminent trans- 
medium Steve Post. 




WBAI 



Page 15 



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City, granting B.A. seeks additional facul- 
ty starting summer 1970. Demands high 
level of commitment, energy, and cre- 
ativity in living-learning situation. Write 
to Bensalem College 555 East 191st St. 
Bronx, N.Y. 10458. 

ABE MANDELBLATT 

Is accepting serious students tor JAZZ 
and BOSSANOVA Guitar. 

For details call 583-6669 

YOUR NATAL HOROiSCOPE 

Progressed to the present time — $25.00 
includes a two hour reading. We offer a 
variety of additional services including 
marriage charts, business charts, selec- 
tions charts to determine the best time 
to begin any venture; and partnership 
comparison charts to determine compati- 
bility. Confidential consultants and rea- 
sonable fees. 

Astrology Consultants Inc. 

2 Pennsylvania Plaza, Suite 1500 

New York, N.Y. 10001 (21) 244-3100 



Exclusive Edition of Alexander Dobkin 

Lithograph, 5 color, 22" x 30", $50 un- 
framed, $80 framed. 

Bklyn. Heights Youth Center, 
406 Atlantic Ave., Bklyn. TR 5-4202 

MATHEMATICS 

Arith.; alg.; geom.; trig.; mod. math.; 
anal, geom.; calculus; GRE; physics; 
electronics. Expd. tutor. 
787-0238 

WBAI Staff Member 

Desperately needs a nice quiet place to 
spend June vacation by the sea or in the 
country. Must be cheap (or free). Call 
Dan in the Music Dept. afternoons. 

WHAT ARE YOUR KIDS DOING THIS 
SUMMER? 

MAYBE THEY'D LIKE 
CAMP ABELARD 

Camp ABELARD is a Non-profit, Inter- 
racial, Inter-cultural organization. The full 
range of camp activities, in a co-operative 
atmosphere. Focus on individuality, em- 
phasis on the Creative arts, pioneering 
and conservation. 130 boys and girls 
from 6-16 with 4 and 8 week sessions. 
Work Camp Program. Suzanne Gottlieb, 
director. 

CAMP ABELARD 

1 Union Square West 

Room 906, New York 10003 

(212) 675-5514 

I am planing to travel overland from 
London to India via the Middle East by 
Landrover camper. Leaving early summer. 
Need one or two companions to share 
expenses. Jerome Koenig, 228 W. 71 St., 
NYC. 873-1001 or 541-8100. 

DESIGNS IN WOOD 

Sleeping lofts our specialty. Work done in 
cedar, pine, oak and redwood. Bolts and 
screws used throughout. Inexpensive. Free 
est. Call TR7-1892 or CY4-6023. 



The SDanish Diaspora 
Who Rememliers? Who Cares? 




Join Pablo Casals, Salvador de 
Madariaga, Roger Baldwin, Alexander 
Calder, Lewis Mumford, and others in 
helping the Spanish Republicans 
exiled in France who fought fascist 
Franco, and later on, Hitler; suffering 
wounds of civil war and concentration 
camps. They are among the few who 
have never relented in fighting fascism. 

Help the tubercular, the diabetic, 
the blind, the old, the sick . . . 

A Holiday gift -a monthly adoption 
— whatever — will bring them the joy 
of knowing WE DO CARE! ! WE DO 
REMEMBER!! 



SPANISH REFUGEE AID 

80 East 11 St., Dept 5, NYC 10003 

Here is my contribution of $ 



I can adopt a refugee and send $_ 
a month. 



Namfi 






AdflfP'!'' 


City 


SlatP 


7in 


Contributions are tax-deductible 



for CHANGE of ADDRESS or RENEWAL 

Name (if repewal 

New address Gtlter 

City amount) 



Stale 



Zip 



$ 



WBAI 

359 e. 62 St. 

n.y.c. 

10021 



ATTACH LABEL HERE 




Z w 3* ^ 
o j4 o 5 

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